Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701
Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701

Taiga Takahashi Denim Jacket Raw Indigo Lot.701

STOCK STORE
The iconic T.T denim jacket is made from original denim fabric from Okayama Prefecture. The fabric is U.S. made organic cotton light-ounce denim woven on an old-style power loom in Okayama, Japan. The denim fabric is woven slowly on an old-type power loom, also known as a shuttle loom, which can weave at only 1/10 to 1/20 the speed of modern looms, leaving the original unevenness of the cotton yarns, resulting in a subtle irregularity. The warp yarn is indigo mixed with sulfide dyes and has a weathered green cast color. The core is dyed white by rope-dyeing. The weft yarn is a custom-made nep yarn dyed to a yellowish color, which evokes the passage of time. By using these two types of yarns, T.T creates an original deep indigo blue. The finishing touch is a shrink-proofing process called sanforized finish. The fabric is a selvedge denim with a finish called “white ears,” used in various places, including the back of the belt. The custom-made engraved buttons and back are all made of iron and are not plated on the surface, so they will rust over time, allowing them to age well. As the name of the item suggests, all details have been reproduced using the same production method as in the 1920s. The signature leather patches are dyed with Amami-Oshima mud, and the buttons and rivets are reproduced in their original colors after researching Art Deco style buttons and rivets from the 1940s.